12/11/11

Christmas Carols

Here are a few of MsBitty all time favorite Christmas Carols and a bit of history thanks to Meredith Corporation. Enjoy and sing away!!
Deck the Halls
Although the background of this song has never been identified, most historians estimate that both the lyrics and melody originate from
16th-century Wales.

Deck the halls with boughs of holly,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
‘Tis the season to be jolly,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Don we now our gay apparel,
Fa la la, la la la, la la la.
Troll the ancient Yule tide carol,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.

See the blazing Yule before us,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Strike the harp and join the chorus.
Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Follow me in merry measure,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
While I tell of Yule tide treasure,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Fast away the old year passes,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Hail the new, ye lads and lasses,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Sing we joyous, all together,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.
Heedless of the wind and weather,
Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Joy to the World

The lyrics to this song come from a 1719 hymn written by Englishman Isaac Watts. The melody has been credited to two composers: German George Frederick Handel and American Lowell Mason.
Joy to the world, the Lord is come!

Let earth receive her King;
Let every heart prepare Him room,
And Heaven and nature sing,
And Heaven and nature sing,
And Heaven, and Heaven, and nature sing.

Joy to the world, the Savior reigns!
Let men their songs employ;
While fields and floods, rocks, hills and plains
Repeat the sounding joy,
Repeat the sounding joy,
Repeat, repeat, the sounding joy.

No more let sins and sorrows grow,
Nor thorns infest the ground;
He comes to make His blessings flow
Far as the curse is found,
Far as the curse is found,
Far as, far as, the curse is found.


He rules the world with truth and grace,
And makes the nations prove
The glories of His righteousness,
And wonders of His love,
And wonders of His love,
And wonders, wonders, of His love.

Jingle Bells

Boston musician James S. Pierpont wrote the lyrics and melody to this song for a Sunday school class in 1857. One hundred years later, it inspired one of the best-known Christmas rock songs, “Jingle Bell Rock.”

Dashing through the snow
In a one-horse open sleigh
O’er the fields we go
Laughing all the way

Bells on bobtail ring
Making spirits bright
What fun it is to sing a sleighing song tonight!

Oh! Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way.
What fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!

O Christmas Tree

Some historians have said this German folk carol is from the Middle Ages, but most likely it was created in the 16th or 17th century.

O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
Thy leaves are so unchanging;
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
Thy leaves are so unchanging;
Not only green when summer’s here,
But also when ‘tis cold and drear.
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
Thy leaves are so unchanging!

O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
Thy candles shine so brightly;
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
Thy candles shine so brightly;
From base to summit, gay and bright,
There’s only splendor for the sight.
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
Thy candles shine so brightly!


O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
How richly God has decked thee;
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
How richly God has decked thee;
Thou bidst us true and faithful be,
And trust in God unchangingly.
O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree!
How richly God has decked thee!

Silent Night

On Christmas Eve 1818, in Austria, the organ in St. Nicholas Church
broke down. Franz Gruber, the organist, was forced to write a
simple melody for two solo voices, the chorus, and a guitar. With
Father Joseph Mohr’s simple set of lyrics, the song was performed at
the evening service to great acclaim.

Silent night, holy night
All is calm, all is bright
Round yon Virgin, Mother and Child
Holy Infant so tender and mild
Sleep in heavenly peace
Sleep in heavenly peace


Silent night, holy night!
Shepherds quake at the sight
Glories stream from heaven afar
Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia!
Christ, the Savior is born
Christ, the Savior is born

Silent night, holy night
Son of God, love’s pure light
Radiant beams from Thy holy face
With the dawn of redeeming grace
Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth
Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth

The First Noel

This piece originates from 16th-century England. It was first published
in a package of cards in 1833.

The first Noel the angels did say
Was to certain poor shepherds
In fields as they lay,
In fields where they lay
Keeping their sheep on a cold winter’s night
That was so deep.
Noel Noel Noel Noel!
Born is the King of Israel!

They looked up and saw a star
Shining in the East beyond them far,
And to the earth it gave great light,
And so it continued both day and night.
Noel Noel Noel Noel!
Born is the King of Israel!


This star drew nigh to the northwest
Over Bethlehem it took its rest,
And there it did both stop and stay
Right over the place where Jesus lay.
Noel Noel Noel Noel!
Born is the King of Israel!

Then entered in those wise men three
Full reverently upon their knee,
And offered there in His presence
Their gold, and myrrh and frankincense.
Noel Noel Noel Noel!


The Twelve Days of Christmas

This English folk song was written prior to the 19th century. Historians say the “Twelve Days” represent those between the birth of Christ (Christmas, December 25) and the coming of the Magi (Epiphany, January 6).

On the first day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
A partridge in a pear tree.

On the second day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Two turtle doves…


On the third day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Three French hens…

On the fourth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Four calling birds…

On the fifth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Five golden rings…

On the sixth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Six geese a-laying…

On the seventh day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Seven swans a-swimming…


On the eighth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Eight maids a-milking…

On the ninth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Nine ladies dancing…

On the tenth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Ten lords a-leaping...

On the eleventh day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Eleven pipers piping…


On the twelfth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me:
Twelve drummers drumming,
Eleven pipers piping
Ten lords a-leaping...
Nine ladies dancing,
Eight maids a-milking,
Seven swans a-swimming,
Six geese a-laying,
Five golden rings!
Four calling birds,
Three French hens,
Two turtle doves,
and a partridge in a pear tree.

Up on the Housetop

Composer Benjamin R. Hanby, of Ohio, wrote this children’s favorite in
the mid-1800s.

Up on the housetop reindeer pause
Out jumps good old Santa Claus;
Down through the chimney with lots of toys
All for the little ones, Christmas joys

Ho, ho, ho, who wouldn’t go?
Ho, ho, ho, who wouldn’t go?
Up on the housetop, click, click, click
Down through the chimney with good Saint Nick.

We Wish You a Merry Christmas

This song was created in England, and historians believe it originated in the 16th century.

We wish you a merry Christmas
We wish you a merry Christmas
We wish you a merry Christmas
And a happy New Year.

We all know that Santa’s coming
We all know that Santa’s coming
We all know that Santa’s coming
And soon will be here.

Good tidings to we bring
To you and you kin
We wish you a merry Christmas
And a happy New Year.


3 comments:

FabricFascination said...

You have me singing along.

hopeandjoyhome said...

I love most Christmas music.. sometimes I get a bit irritated to hear it in November but that is because it reminds me what a total procrastinator I am!

daydreamsdustbunnies said...

I love those songs, too, but not too early.

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